Putting Learning in the Best Light

December 4, 2016 Acuity News

New lighting technology allows teachers to change classroom lighting to improve focus and engagement.

Teachers have a new tool to improve student behavior and performance in the classroom: tunable white lighting. When students are sluggish or not engaged; when they complain about being tired or can’t settle down for reading time,  being able to adjust the color of white light to be warmer or cooler can change the classroom dynamics  - with a positive effect on student mood, behavior, concentration and focus. 

Teachers, parents and school administrators should be informed about the benefits of tunable white lighting in the classroom.  That’s why we launched our Lighting for Pupils campaign, which features an essay contest in which K-5 students tell us “What Light Means to Me.” The best essays will WIN a tunable lighting system for their classroom! 

And we know teachers don’t have time to fuss with technology, so our BLT Series Tunable White Luminaire with nTune technology. The BLT Series allows both the light level and color temperature to be easily adjusted at the touch of a button to the optimal setting for student tasks such as reading or test-taking. In fact, the BLT features optional pre-set wall pods available with four default productivity settings that support common learning environments:

  • Collaboration (General Task): (4200K) cool, crisp light ideal for collaboration;
  • Visual Acuity (Reading): (3000K) warm color for improved visual acuity;
  • Mental Acuity (Test Taking): (3500K) neutral, non-distracting color temperature; and
  • Renew (Energy Up): (5000K) cooler, refreshing light to help combat afternoon fatigue

 

Tuning the light in the classroom can have very real – and positive – effects on student behavior and performance.  It can transform the classroom of yesterday into the learning environment of tomorrow.  Click here to learn more!

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